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Thought for the day

Thought for the day

Sometimes how you say something IS more important than what you say.

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Join me at Kepler College’s Astrology Day Cafe

Join me at Kepler College's Astrology Day Cafe

March 20, 2014 from 10 am to 8 pm Pacific Daylight Time (1 pm to 11 pm Eastern)

Join Kepler College online for an all-day Astrology Café as Kepler celebrates International Astrology Day. Every hour we have a new set of guests who are representative of a wide variety of astrological practices. You can drop in at any time. Hosted by Enid Newberg, Karen McCauley and Donna Woodwell.
Below is our schedule of speakers (all times are Pacific Daylight Time)
10:00 am Choosing Your Moment, Electional Astrology with Faye Cossar and Christine Arens
11:00 am The Future of astrology education, with Nicholas Campion and Ena Stanley
12:00 pm Visualizing Astrology, with A.T. Mann and Adrian Duncan
1:00 pm Evolutionary Astrology and Soul, with Mark Jones and Laura Nalbandian
2:00 pm Astrology and China, with David Railey and Gisele Terry
3:00 pm Negotiating with Planets (aka Remediation), with Tamira McGillivray, Kenneth Miller and Andrea Gehrtz,
4:00 pm What’s in an Archetype? With Michelle Gould, Margaret Gray and Inga Thornell
5:00 pm Healing with the Stars: Medical Astrology with Lee Lehman, William Morris, and Judith Holloway
6:00 pm Astrological Mystery Dessert of the Day, with Bruce Scofield, Ronnie Dreyer and Georgia Stathis
7:00 pm Astrology’s Ancient Roots, with Robert Hand and Chris Brennan

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Welcome Spring!

The Equinox Tradition:

Spring is the dawn of the new zodiacal year in the Northern Hemisphere. Don’t you just love the word “equinox?” I have to decide each time whether to say it with a short or long “e”. The equinoxes are the two times during the year when the dark of night and the light of day are in balance or equal. Another name for the Vernal Equinox is Ostara, from the name of a German Goddess of fertility, Oestarae.

She is the deific equivalent of the Greco-Roman goddess, Aurora, the personification of the sunrise. Consider that the Sun rises in the East and her name is where East and Easter both come from. The Christian Easter date was decided by the Council of Nicaea to fall the first Sunday after the first full Moon occurring on or after the March Equinox. This effectively removed its observance from conflicts with either Ostara or Passover.  Read the rest of this entry »


Regret…

Regret...

Quote for today: The only thing scarier than change is regret.

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Quote for the day.

Quote for the day.

One small positive thought in the morning can change your whole day

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Listen to Whale songs… Live!

Click: Listen to Whale songs… Live!

Would you like a break from Winter? Ya, me too.

So I just found the Jupiter Foundation’s website where you can listen to the Humpback whales live from their winter breeding grounds in Hawaii. You can also download a whale song ringtone for your phone or just watch the beauty of the Puako Bay beach on the webcam.

This link will take you to the Jupiter Foundation’s website.

This link will take you to the Puako Bay webcam.

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RIP Paco de Lucia

Guitarist Paco de Lucia died in Mexico yesterday, he was 66 years old.

Here is the link from MSN News. Click here for the BBC News link.

I thought you might enjoy video clips of him, the clip below is the complete Friday Night in San Francisco album with no ads. This was a 1981 live album by Al Di Meola, John McLaughlin and Paco de Lucía.

The video at the top of the post is the same three performers, older and with a full orchestra for back up. Enjoy!

My mom played guitar, as well as ukulele, in the 60′s,

mom on her ukulele

mom on her ukulele

and we had real Spanish guitar on a reel to reel tape,
we even saw Andre Segovia in concert,

but until Scott played this for me…

It was like I’d never heard guitar before.

They were having fun, playing, speaking to each other with the music,

just beautiful, and mind blowing.

If you need me today, I’ll be listening to these recording in between classes.

I hope you do too.

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Some of the ways pets can improve your health…

Rob is always ready to help me relax

Rob is always ready to help me relax

 

Those of us with therapy animals know how well they help others, but they also help their handlers. Here’s a nice slide show to illustrate the many ways.

Click for the SLIDESHOW


Name that Moon!

Did you know that each full moon of the year has a name? 

I have had a couple of people ask me about an email they’ve received about a supposed Blood moon that happens once in 250 years and sounds really ominous… 

Well, here is the Blood Moon in context with the rest of the full moons of the year. These are copied from the Farmer’s Almanac.

ImageFull Moon Names and Their Meanings

Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year. Here is the Farmers Almanac’s list of the full Moon names.

• Full Wolf Moon – January Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January’s full Moon. Sometimes it was also referred to as the Old Moon, or the Moon After Yule. Some called it the Full Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Moon.

• Full Snow Moon – February Since the heaviest snow usually falls during this month, native tribes of the north and east most often called February’s full Moon the Full Snow Moon. Some tribes also referred to this Moon as the Full Hunger Moon, since harsh weather conditions in their areas made hunting very difficult.

• Full Worm Moon – March As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

• Full Pink Moon – April This name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. Other names for this month’s celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

• Full Flower Moon – May In most areas, flowers are abundant everywhere during this time. Thus, the name of this Moon. Other names include the Full Corn Planting Moon, or the Milk Moon.

• Full Strawberry Moon – June This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

• The Full Buck Moon – July July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. It was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, for the reason that thunderstorms are most frequent during this time. Another name for this month’s Moon was the Full Hay Moon.

• Full Sturgeon Moon – August The fishing tribes are given credit for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.

• Full Corn Moon or Full Harvest Moon – September This full moon’s name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon, which is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering.

• Full Hunter’s Moon or Full Harvest Moon – October This full Moon is often referred to as the Full Hunter’s Moon, Blood Moon, or Sanguine Moon. Many moons ago, Native Americans named this bright moon for obvious reasons. The leaves are falling from trees, the deer are fattened, and it’s time to begin storing up meat for the long winter ahead. Because the fields were traditionally reaped in late September or early October, hunters could easily see fox and other animals that come out to glean from the fallen grains. Probably because of the threat of winter looming close, the Hunter’s Moon is generally accorded with special honor, historically serving as an important feast day in both Western Europe and among many Native American tribes.

• Full Beaver Moon – November This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon.

• The Full Cold Moon; or the Full Long Nights Moon – December During this month the winter cold fastens its grip, and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is also sometimes called the Moon before Yule. The term Long Night Moon is a doubly appropriate name because the midwinter night is indeed long, and because the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it is opposite a low Sun.

Click here to go to The Farmer’s Almanac Website


Chinese New Year is Jan 31st

Moganshan_4871

photo: wikipedia

This is the Year of the Wood Horse

And just in time to celebrate… here is a free lecture from The Teaching Company.

You know how much I love history… and The Teaching Company. This one’s part of the course, Foundations of Eastern Civilization, by Dr. Craig G. Benjamin, Associate Professor of History in the Frederik Meijer Honors College at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. In this lecture, you will:

  • look at the political rebellions that led to today’s republic,
  • meet Mao Zedong, Sun Yatsen, and Chiang Kai-shek,
  • and witness conflict between Nationalist and Communist parties.

Click to listen: Teaching Company Free Lecture

Click to learn about the course: Foundations of Eastern Civilization

Click to learn more about the Chinese Zodiac

Click here for other element Horse years


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