Fit competition

English: Frosted cupcakes from Mon Petit Cupca...

Just got a text about this…  “did you ever notice that if you mention to a co-worker that you are on a diet, only to have them pressure you to try the cupcakes in the staff lounge?”

I have noticed over the years that if you are ever going to try to get any competition going in an office or home, start an exercise competition. With exercise, people will strive to exercise more than each other. While if you start a diet competition, generally people will either “cheat together” or will try to knock each other off their diets, really! And if you didn’t think the mere mention that you were dieting meant you were starting a competition… WRONG! LOL

 

Is it human nature?

 

I think it is that exercise is a positive thing in that it is something that we can compete at by  DOING  more than someone else.

 

While dieting is a negative thing in that it implies that you compete by not doing something, like eating fewer cupcakes than someone else. “Eat Fewer” just doesn’t make sense to an action oriented person the way “walk 20 minutes” does.

 

Anyone can see that the way to win at this sort of game is to make the other co-worker eat more cupcakes! :)
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Get Fit Without a Gym

Rob, hot on the trail!

I just read an article discussing a new poll by the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA). It shows that Americans are spending less on fitness but are not necessarily exercising less. Walking, treadmills, hand weights, running/jogging, and weight/resistance machines were the top five fitness activities.

Some people find they work out better if they commit to driving to the gym and having uninterrupted time for themselves. I’ve joined gyms occasionally but I always end up going back to exercising at home. I am guilt-motivated so having Robert staring at me and trying to Jedi-mind-trick me into putting his leash on works well for me. What works for you?

Click here to read the MSNBC article.


Labels, Calories, Marketing and You!

I learned an important lesson recently. That I have to read labels every single time even on products I “trust.” Product formulations and labels change. Protein bars I trusted in the past have substituted maltitol for sucralose and my BBQ sauce added high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). The other thing is that according to independent lab testing, diet products, including products made for diabetics, have been shown to have sugar, corn starch and HFCS that are not on the label. It appears that when manufacturers run short of an ingredient, they just substitute something else, even if that something else is sugar in a sugar-free labeled product. This makes it impossible to trust anything.
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More Goodies from the Kitchen, this time for the humans!

So I bought a flat of pears at Costco, and I really love dried fruit. It is a great way to pack fruit in a lunchbag or briefcase without having to worry about it getting bruised of squished. Packaged dried fruit usually contains sugar or is sulphered so I wouldn’t really recommend it as a diet-friendly fruit replacement. By drying my own I can control exactly what goes in it. I prefer… nothing!

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The Car Metaphor

Car Clipart

Imagine that your body is a car. Now, we both know it isn’t a car, but a car is the perfect vehicle, no pun intended, to learn about fuel and how we fuel our bodies. So you have a car that you love, or at least care about, and you want to provide it with fuel so that you can drive it around and go places.

Now most of us don’t top off the fuel tank continually while we are driving around, we drive until we are well into the reserve and the little “E” indicator is lit up. But what do we do to our bodies?

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Merry Christmas!

Happy Christmas to you all! I’ve put together a few ideas to help you get into the spirit, the fit Christmas spirit, that is…

Use the Christmas Calorie Counter to estimate what you will eat for Christmas appetizers, dinner and dessert. You can use it to figure out trade offs for some high calorie items or to calculate how much exercise you’ll need to do to work off a splurge.

Make a holiday tradition of walking. Traditionally, Christmas-time was when the most socializing happened. Progressive dinners, parties, caroling, wassailing, and ice skating are all more a part of this holiday than are the more modern so called celebration of sitting around eating and watching movies. Take a family walk before or after dinner. Here are some good tips for walkers.

To brush up on your visualization skills, try the portion-size pop quiz from Prevention magazine.

Try to look at the holiday as a social time, it is about visiting and bonding, not just food. Enjoy your relative and friends and be joyful!


Turkey Feast

Here is what we had for Thanksgiving dinner!

Quick, think about Thanksgiving dinner…. what three items come to mind first?

For both of us, it was turkey, stuffing and cranberry sauce. So I decided to stick with the winners and not make too much food.  I adapted this from the Zojirushi website and a couple of different stuffing-loaf recipes I found. This turned out to be a perfect Thanksgiving or Christmas feast for two because you get all the flavors of the season with minimal cleanup and leftovers that can be stored in one container rather than cluttering the fridge with a bunch of separate containers. It would also be a great way to use up some leftover turkey.

Ingredients:
turkey, meat from 2 thighs, cubed
4 Tbs olive oil or butter
1/2 onion, chopped
3 celery ribs, chopped
1 tsp poultry seasoning
1 tsp vegesal or salt
pepper to taste
1 apple, diced
2 cups chicken broth
2 eggs, beaten
1 package cornbread stuffing, bread cube stuffing or about 1 loaf of dry, cubed bread

Process:
saute onion and celery until onion is transparent. Add seasonings and remove from heat. Put turkey and stuffing or bread into a large mixing bowl. Heat broth and stir into stuffing mixture, add eggs, then sauted vegies and the apple, stirring after each addition.

Bake:
Pour into 2 qt. casserole and bake at 375 for about 40 minutes until top is browned. I poured the whole thing into my Zojirushi bread machine and used the meatloaf setting, time: 110, with the crust setting set to “dark.” Makes 6-8 servings. Serve slices with gravy or a scoop of cranberry sauce on top.

Tips:
I cooked two turkey thighs in the crockpot the day before. and poured the juice into a glass measuring cup and kept both in the refrigerator until I was ready to make the loaf. Then I added enough broth to the juice to make 2 cups. You could use leftover turkey or breast meat, if you prefer. You could add fresh sage or  a 1/2 cup of parsley, or swap dried cherries, dried cranberries or chestnuts for the apple.

Verdict:

We both thought this was fantastic and will definitely be making it again!


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