About these ads

YUM!

I made this yesterday from one of my favorite blogs: Chocolate Covered Katie. Here is the complete recipe: The Ultimate Chocolate Fudge Pie. It fit all my criteria for a Saturday evening dessert: gluten-free, dairy free, low-sugar, low-calorie, quick, zap it in the food processor & no-bake. Wow! We both loved it. A long, long time ago Scott used to make tofu cheesecake for potlucks with his dive-buddies and he wouldn’t tell anyone what was in it until it was all gone. I don’t eat soy very often but when I do, this will be at the top of my list!

About these ads

A new recipe – Shredded Pork

I noticed that it has been a long time since I posted a recipe. I generally make it when pork is on sale but it will work with beef or chicken. Don’t fret the large quantity this makes because it freezes well. Read the rest of this entry »


Corned Beef and Cabbage

We dove into this before I could get a picture but CBC looks pretty much the same however you make it so use your imagination, K?

I use the crockpot for this but you could just use a covered pot on the stove. Put a chopped onion in the bottom of the crockpot and put corned beef on top of the onion. Turn on at low temp for 8-10 hours or 3 hours if you are simmering it on the stove. Then 1 hour before you are ready to eat, cut your cabbage head into 4 wedges and arrange them on top of the corned beef.

Remove to a platter when done and serve with horseradish or mustard and soda bread.

The traditional corned beef and cabbage dinner is traditional to… Irish Americans. The Irish immigrants couldn’t find a local analogue to the type of bacon they were used to so they adopted corned beef from their Jewish neighbors.

Click here to read about traditional Irish food.


More Goodies from the Kitchen, this time for the humans!

So I bought a flat of pears at Costco, and I really love dried fruit. It is a great way to pack fruit in a lunchbag or briefcase without having to worry about it getting bruised of squished. Packaged dried fruit usually contains sugar or is sulphered so I wouldn’t really recommend it as a diet-friendly fruit replacement. By drying my own I can control exactly what goes in it. I prefer… nothing!

Read the rest of this entry »


Goodies From the Kitchen

Hey there! It has been a while. I was transferring some photos of Rob in the snow and in assorted Seattle area parks from my phone to my laptop and found the pictures of his birthday treats:

The peanut butter cookies are from here. This year, instead of making bark, I made clusters. He loved them. Actually, We all ate our fair share. You know, I’ve never been able to relate to those who don’t like carob.  It is really good, mellow and sweet without the bitterness of chocolate. I guess it would be pretty bland if you were trying to use it as a chocolate substitute instead of just enjoying it as a whole different animal.

Read the rest of this entry »


Happy Birthday, Robert!

Robert Bruce will be 3 on the 19th! At least he is according to his paperwork from the Pierce County Humane Society. They have a birth date that I assume is the day he was found backdated to however old they thought he he was. The really cute part is that his breed is listed as “little brown dog.” I guess they don’t see many Chinooks. He has lived with us since June 6th of 2007.
I’ll make Rob’s favorite: oatmeal peanut butter cookies. When I made these last year I left out the wheat germ because I don’t keep that around and just added a little more flour and oatmeal. They were as popular with the humans as the dogs and we ate as many as Rob did!

He will also get some new skineez. Freya ate most of these when he wasn’t looking.

I’m also making Freya’s favorite: peanut butter bark. My friend, Molly, made this last Christmas and it was Freya’s absolute favorite treat ever. For anyone who doesn’t know this yet… We lost our Freya just before Thanksgiving. She was a beautiful dog and a wonderful friend. Thank you for all the kind notes and condolences.

Rob’s Flickr photostream.

Freya’s Flickr photostream.


Turkey Feast

Here is what we had for Thanksgiving dinner!

Quick, think about Thanksgiving dinner…. what three items come to mind first?

For both of us, it was turkey, stuffing and cranberry sauce. So I decided to stick with the winners and not make too much food.  I adapted this from the Zojirushi website and a couple of different stuffing-loaf recipes I found. This turned out to be a perfect Thanksgiving or Christmas feast for two because you get all the flavors of the season with minimal cleanup and leftovers that can be stored in one container rather than cluttering the fridge with a bunch of separate containers. It would also be a great way to use up some leftover turkey.

Ingredients:
turkey, meat from 2 thighs, cubed
4 Tbs olive oil or butter
1/2 onion, chopped
3 celery ribs, chopped
1 tsp poultry seasoning
1 tsp vegesal or salt
pepper to taste
1 apple, diced
2 cups chicken broth
2 eggs, beaten
1 package cornbread stuffing, bread cube stuffing or about 1 loaf of dry, cubed bread

Process:
saute onion and celery until onion is transparent. Add seasonings and remove from heat. Put turkey and stuffing or bread into a large mixing bowl. Heat broth and stir into stuffing mixture, add eggs, then sauted vegies and the apple, stirring after each addition.

Bake:
Pour into 2 qt. casserole and bake at 375 for about 40 minutes until top is browned. I poured the whole thing into my Zojirushi bread machine and used the meatloaf setting, time: 110, with the crust setting set to “dark.” Makes 6-8 servings. Serve slices with gravy or a scoop of cranberry sauce on top.

Tips:
I cooked two turkey thighs in the crockpot the day before. and poured the juice into a glass measuring cup and kept both in the refrigerator until I was ready to make the loaf. Then I added enough broth to the juice to make 2 cups. You could use leftover turkey or breast meat, if you prefer. You could add fresh sage or  a 1/2 cup of parsley, or swap dried cherries, dried cranberries or chestnuts for the apple.

Verdict:

We both thought this was fantastic and will definitely be making it again!


Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

How do you spell Comfort Food? I spell it: Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

Ingredients:

  • 2 stalks celery
  • 2 large carrots
  • 1 onion (or you can use 1 container of Trader Joes mirepoix)
  • 1 pound chicken (I use skinless boneless breasts)
  • 1 bayleaf, salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 teaspoon herbes de Provence
  • 1 container of Pacific Chicken broth
  • 1 &1/3 cups rice.

Process:

I make this in the crockpot. I put the vegies into the pot, cut the chicken breast into pieces and put it on top of the veg, add everything but the rice and let cook until chicken is tender (4 – 5 hours in mine) then stir in the rice and let it cook another half hour to an hour depending on when you are ready to eat. Serves 4 at about 238 calories per serving

Rice Diversity. Part of the image collection o...

Rice Diversity

Notes:

You can use any rice, I like Royal Blend. I have also made it with poultry seasoning rather than the herbs de Provence.


Eric’s Rutabaga Soup Recipe

Rutabaga Soup

Eric said I should write this one up, I guess that means it was tasty!

If you’ve seen rutabagas in the store and wondered what you could do with them, try this recipe. This soup takes advantage of the rutabaga’s sweetness while disguising its cabbage-y flavor. Rutabagas are an excellent source of Vitamin C, folate, potassium, dietary fiber, calcium, iron, niacin, and Vitamin A. Raw rutabaga contains an exceptionally high amount of the cancer-fighting glucosinolates, even more than other cabbage members.

I had no idea, until I looked it up for this post, that the rutabaga originated as a cross between the cabbage and the turnip, and in my opinion, they taste better than either. In WWI Germany, the famine of 1916-17 was known as the Rutabaga Winter. They are tough to peel with a knife,  a vegetable peeler works much better. Many people serve them roasted and buttered, fried or whatever, but I like them to disappear into a soup. You can use a small one, two small ones, one large, whatever, this is a very forgiving recipe. Rutabagas are also called Swedes or Swedish turnips which would make this Swedish Turnip soup:

Ingredients:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/2 onion
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 1 rutabaga (any size, peeled and diced)
  • 1 carton low sodium broth or water
  • 2 bayleaves
  • 1 can stewed or readycut tomatoes (14.5 oz can)
  • 1 Tbsp paprika
  • salt & pepper to taste.

Process:

Slice and sauté onion and celery in oils, peel and cube rutabaga and add to pot, pour in half the broth, add bayleaf and simmer until rutabaga is soft. Then, mash rutabaga with a masher or fork, add tomatoes and remaining ingredients and simmer 15 minutes or so to blend flavors, serves 4, about 140 calories per serving.

Notes:

If you want to cook it faster, you can cut up the rutabaga and cook it in the microwave and then stir it into the sautéd vegetables.  For a more elegant and higher-fat soup, puree the finished soup through a blender and either stir in one cup of cream or serve each portion with dollop of sour cream.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 425 other followers