Autumn Ratatouille

It has been way too long in between recipes… but it is Autumn and this looks like the colors of fall leaves, doesn’t it? This version is super-quick, low calorie, vegan, with no added fats, but I’ll add some variations in the postscript in case you want to change it up.

Ratatouille
makes 2 large servings, 230 calories each.

Ingredients:

1 eggplant, cubed (I don’t peel them)

1 carrot, cubed (you can cut it into discs, I just like how it looks shape-wise with the eggplant & corn)

1 2/3 cup frozen corn

1 can S&W stewed Roma Tomatoes, Italian style, 14.5 oz.

Imagine Brand No-Chicken Broth, Low Sodium, 2 cups

2 bay leaves

1/2 tsp garlic powder

1 tsp (or less) Tamari

dash cayenne

Add salt & pepper to taste

Process:

Place cut up vegies in microwaveable bowl and cover (I use a corning ware casserole) cook on high 5 minutes.

Meantime, place a soup pot on burner and heat broth and tomatoes with their liquid, add vegetables and remaining ingredients to liquid and simmer until carrots are tender and flavors are blended, about 20 to 30 minutes. Enjoy with bread or crackers  if desired.

Variations:

For even lower calories, you could substitute yellow pepper for corn, but I like corn and the starchiness makes it filling. You could also use different flavors of S&W tomatoes and stock to change the character of the broth. If you like olive oil and would like a higher fat, higher calorie version, instead of cooking your vegetables in the microwave, brown an onion in olive oil, then add liquids to pot. cook as per remaining instructions.

Every-day Eggplant Parmigiana

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Before you get started, I want to warn you that this is not a traditional recipe, this one is quick and simple enough for a week-night. Click this link if you were looking for a traditional recipe and want to bail out now.

Mine is low-fat, gluten free, and either vegan or vegetarian depending on whether you use mozzarella cheese or a vegan substitute. In case you worry that this is sacrilegious, don’t. First of all, the traditional dish it isn’t from Parma at all, despite the name it is from Southern Italy. Second, there are many regional variations on eggplant Parmigiana, also called eggplant parmesan in the USA, and third, there are two completely different traditions that claim the name, one is the baked casserole type and the other is the stacked slices type. I like the casserole type best but each slice of eggplant is generally salted, pressed, dipped in egg, breaded, then fried, and finally baked with sauce and cheese. That is just too many calories and way too many steps for me. Continue reading “Every-day Eggplant Parmigiana”

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