Goodbye 2016!

I’ll admit the first thing I did this morning was check the 2016 deaths for the full tally now that this awful year is officially over. Remember we started the year with Alan Rickman and David Bowie, continued with Paul Kantner, Prince and Muhammad Ali, Patty Duke, Harper Lee, Gene Wilder and John Glenn, finally ending with Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds.

Here is the full recap of the year, not just the deaths, so you remember that these were only a few among so many others: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016#Deaths

 


Just watched Elf!

And it’s just as funny as ever…


Where’s Santa

Kyoto, JapanJakarta, Indonesia

Are you watching for Santa?

You and the kids can track Santa’s progress all day and night on Norad’s Official Santa Tracker right here: http://www.noradsanta.org/ He and the reindeer and heading toward Drammen Norway right now…


Happy Solstice!

snowflake-mdThe Winter Solstice occurs on December 21st this year, according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac. At the Winter Solstice, the Sun enters the part of the space-time continuum belonging to Capricorn. This is the official first day of Winter in the Northern Hemisphere. The word Solstice is derived from the Latin sol, or “Sun,” and stitium, or “stoppage.” At the Solstice, the Sun appears to both rise and set at the same spot on the horizon.

On or around June 21, the Summer Solstice, the North Pole is tilted most directly Sunward. Those of us in the Northern Hemisphere experience this as the longest day and shortest night of the year. On or around December 21, the Winter Solstice, the North Pole is pointed away from the Sun giving us in the Northern Hemisphere, our shortest day and longest night. It is this tilting of the Earth’s rotational axis that gives us our seasons. If you want more information on how this works, just ask and I can recommend some articles and books that explain it really well. I don’t know about you, but to me, the important part of this is that from here on out, we get a few minutes more of daylight each day, until the Summer Solstice, that is.

Symbols of Winter:

Snow, bare-branched trees, icicles, yule log, Santa Claus with his elves and reindeer, a crèche with Magi and star, etc.

Foods of Winter:

Mulled cider, brandy, eggnog, Julekake, fruitcake, pumpkin, nuts, yams, satsumas, candy canes and fudge, spices.

Colors of Winter:

Blue and white, silver and gold, red and green.

Stones of Winter:

Capricorn is represented by onyx, hematite and garnet.
Aquarius is represented by pietersite, malachite and amethyst.
Pisces is represented by aquamarine, and turquoise and jade.

Activities of Winter:

Skiing and snowshoeing, hanging up lights and decorations, Holiday celebrations, shoveling snow and watching movies like How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Elf, Christmas in Connecticut, White Christmas, Die Hard, National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation…

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The Best Selling Books of All Time

agatha

© Hulton Archive/Getty Images, And Then There Were None (Agatha Christie)

 


Did you see that Harvest Moon?

I found it interesting that there is still so much confusion about what Harvest Moon means. Many sites including NASA seem to think it is just the full Moon in September but it isn’t quite that simple. In a terribly oversimplified explanation what you are seeing is the solar calendar (the months) and the lunar calendar not lining up very well. The following text is from the Farmer’s Almanac:

The Harvest Moon is the one that occurs the closest to the Autumnal Equinox so this year it occurs in September, although occasionally this title can be bestowed upon the October full Moon. From 1970 to 2020 this happens twelve times and, in fact, will happen in 2017. The 2016 version of the Harvest Moon comes six days prior to the Autumnal Equinox, although it can occur as early as September 8 (as in 2014) or as late as October 7 (as in 1987).

Source article: http://farmersalmanac.com/astronomy/2016/09/12/harvest-moon-2016/


Weaving History: How Weaving Took Us to the Moon | Weaving Today

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corerope-memory-nasa

Learn about core rope memory and how it’s a part of both weaving history and scientific history. Without weavers, we couldn’t have gotten to the moon!

Read more at the Source: Weaving History: How Weaving Took Us to the Moon | Weaving Today