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Permission

leisure

I saw this today on Julia Cameron’s Facebook page, and it made me realize how often I don’t really give my self permission to enjoy my leisure time.

 I either: 1. procrastinate it because I don’t “deserve” a break.

 2. multitask it, like combining going out for a coffee plus catching up on some study-reading I need to do.

3. waste it, I just don’t give my self permission so I don’t take the time, even though I could, and I waste time doing something less enjoyable than what I might have chosen to do if I had chosen something.  

Permission is a big deal. I’m pretty sure I am not the only one with this issue. Have you thought about it? 

Julia’s Page: https://www.facebook.com/juliacameronlive/

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It’s going to be a long winter

http://www.bing.com/

Alpine marmots near the Grossglockner High Alpine Road, Austria, http://www.bing.com/

Today was the first bright, clear Groundhog day I can remember seeing in years. Usually it is overcast here and I feel like I can look forward to crocuses a little sooner than March 21st but it is a silly game isn’t it?

Here is a bit about Groundhog day to refresh your memory about the rhyme and what it means.

February 2nd, Groundhog day

It was also known as Candlemas or Imbolc in the old European Calendar. This is the day that Christmas or Yule decorations must officially come down. Here is the full poem for the day from the old Almanack:

If Candlemas day be fair and bright,

Winter will have another flight.

If Candlemas day be clouds and rain,

Winter is gone, and will not come again.

~ E. Holden

The US tradition honors the groundhog, or marmot, as the local weather prognosticator. Other regions honored the fox, the robin and a host of other animals. The animal chosen is not important, nor is the forecast supposed to relate to a whole country, but is said to describe a local microclimate phenomenon. So don’t look at the News, look out your window.

Here is a historical tradition,

In France, February 2nd is known as National Crepe Day—a lot of crepes are consumed, and people try their luck at guessing their fortunes while they cook them. As they hold the crepe pan in one hand and a coin in the other, they flip the crepe to see if they can catch it in the pan. A successful catch means prosperity for the year!

That one came straight from my Zojirushi newsletter, breakfast edition.

Some fun links:

The American Ground Hog: Click here to visit Punxatawney Phil’s official site.

For some of the science behind the tradition, yes, there is a wee bit of science, see the Farmer’s Almanac article.

Most importantly, watch Groundhog Day again. I love this movie.


Standing strong

America’s oldest living fruit tree was planted by Pilgrims in 1630. This is one of the original Endicott pears planted by European settlers, she is still bearing fruit at age 383+.

Source: One of the first US fruit trees planted by European settlers is still alive and well at age 383+ : TreeHugger


Goodbye 2016!

I’ll admit the first thing I did this morning was check the 2016 deaths for the full tally now that this awful year is officially over. Remember we started the year with Alan Rickman and David Bowie, continued with Paul Kantner, Prince and Muhammad Ali, Patty Duke, Harper Lee, Gene Wilder and John Glenn, finally ending with Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds.

Here is the full recap of the year, not just the deaths, so you remember that these were only a few among so many others: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016#Deaths

 


Just watched Elf!

And it’s just as funny as ever…


Where’s Santa

Kyoto, JapanJakarta, Indonesia

Are you watching for Santa?

You and the kids can track Santa’s progress all day and night on Norad’s Official Santa Tracker right here: http://www.noradsanta.org/ He and the reindeer and heading toward Drammen Norway right now…


Happy Solstice!

snowflake-mdThe Winter Solstice occurs on December 21st this year, according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac. At the Winter Solstice, the Sun enters the part of the space-time continuum belonging to Capricorn. This is the official first day of Winter in the Northern Hemisphere. The word Solstice is derived from the Latin sol, or “Sun,” and stitium, or “stoppage.” At the Solstice, the Sun appears to both rise and set at the same spot on the horizon.

On or around June 21, the Summer Solstice, the North Pole is tilted most directly Sunward. Those of us in the Northern Hemisphere experience this as the longest day and shortest night of the year. On or around December 21, the Winter Solstice, the North Pole is pointed away from the Sun giving us in the Northern Hemisphere, our shortest day and longest night. It is this tilting of the Earth’s rotational axis that gives us our seasons. If you want more information on how this works, just ask and I can recommend some articles and books that explain it really well. I don’t know about you, but to me, the important part of this is that from here on out, we get a few minutes more of daylight each day, until the Summer Solstice, that is.

Symbols of Winter:

Snow, bare-branched trees, icicles, yule log, Santa Claus with his elves and reindeer, a crèche with Magi and star, etc.

Foods of Winter:

Mulled cider, brandy, eggnog, Julekake, fruitcake, pumpkin, nuts, yams, satsumas, candy canes and fudge, spices.

Colors of Winter:

Blue and white, silver and gold, red and green.

Stones of Winter:

Capricorn is represented by onyx, hematite and garnet.
Aquarius is represented by pietersite, malachite and amethyst.
Pisces is represented by aquamarine, and turquoise and jade.

Activities of Winter:

Skiing and snowshoeing, hanging up lights and decorations, Holiday celebrations, shoveling snow and watching movies like How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Elf, Christmas in Connecticut, White Christmas, Die Hard, National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation…

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