Thanksgiving Coloring Pages

I thought it would be fun to post a list of current Thanksgiving themed coloring pages, click the links below, to save and print the originals from their sites. You could use them to decorate, as patterns for other crafts like a flag or a banner or even in a flower arrangement, or to entertain the kids while the adults do boring stuff like socializing.

I think everyone knows by now that coloring is the new yoga, right? It is supposed to relax you and help you focus better, “Promoters of coloring for the older set say it has therapeutic properties and can aid in personal growth. ‘Creativity positively impacts many parts of our lives and helps us grow cognitively, emotionally and even professionally,’ notes Brit Morin, CEO and founder of Brit + Co in the article linked below. I’ve included the NBC News link on the stress relieving effects of coloring and another on the Greek mythological antecedents of the Thanksgiving cornucopia, ya, of course it’s Greek.

Link to Adult Coloring Article from NBC News.

The Story of the Cornucopia from Greek Myth

‘I am Thankful for’, single colorful page

Autumn leaves, so many uses for these!

Fall Coloring Page, Alisa Burke

Raising Our Kids’ Coloring Pages website, multiple pages

Turkey, alive in a field, not cooked on a platter

Charlie Brown and Snoopy with a turkey on a platter

Cute stylized turkey

Autumn Harvest with a scarecrow

Another live turkey

Fall Y’all page from Abstract Doodles

Pilgrims in Mayflower

A Masted Ship, no pilgrims, says Happy Thankgsgiving above it

Harvest Scene

Related Post:

Find Thanksgiving Clip Art

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September 23rd is the Autumnal Equinox

first-day-of-fall-2015-northern-hemisphere-6003706315145216-hp

The google doodle for Sep 23, 20015

Today is the day the Sun enters Libra and the beginning of Autumn. In the same way that the Solstice marks the days of longest and shortest “light,” the Equinoxes mark the day of equal light. Nox is the Roman goddess of night so equinox literally means “equal night.” The glyph for Libra represents the setting sun expressing the balance between night and day. In traditional Astrology, the Sun is “exalted” in Aries while halfway through its circuit along the ecliptic, it is in “fall” in Libra, Aries’ opposite sign.

The rising of the constellation Libra marked the beginning of the New Year in ancient Egypt. Equinoxes are the two points in the year (March 19-21 and September 21-23) when the Sun crosses the celestial equator. At these times, day and night in Northern and Southern hemispheres are of equal length. The Spring (vernal) Equinox occurs midway between the Winter and Summer solstices; the Autumnal Equinox occurs midway between the Summer and Winter solstices. The Autumn equinoctial festival of Mabon mirrors the spring equinoctial festival of Oestara with the Light and Dark forces of the Universe switching ascendancy.

In myth, the goddess Persephone departs the earth to join her husband in the underworld. It is time to give thanks for the summer and to welcome the impending dark. Traditionally, this was when some of the heaviest work of the agricultural year began. The harvest was stored away, the farm animals were measured against their feed and decisions were made about how many to keep and how many to slaughter and eat. This is why so much Thanksgiving feasting went on now. Fresh meat and fruit only last so long.

Symbols of Autumn:

Blackberries, cranberries, wine, gourds, pine cones, acorns, nuts, corn, apples, pomegranates, ivy

Foods of Autumn:

Breads, nuts, apples, squash, pomegranates, and pumpkin pie.

Colors of Autumn:

The colors of the sunset: violet, orange, russet, maroon, brown, and gold.

Stones of Autumn:

Libra is pink tourmaline, opal and rhodochrosite. Scorpio is topaz, bloodstone, and yellow agate. Sagittarius is turquoise and jasper.

Activities of Autumn:

Making cider and wine, gathering seeds and seedpods, walking in the woods, Halloween, and Thanksgiving celebrations, Christmas shopping.



Welcome Autumn!

Have you noticed the change in the light? The sun is already much lower in the sky at noon. Even though it still feels like Summer, the Equinox is upon us so get ready for what is known in Seattle as the season of Rain, also known as the season of Dark. Years ago my friend Jules commented that she missed the “real” seasons of Montana. I countered that we have seasons here, but she replied, ‘Inga, mold is not a season.’ That still makes me chuckle whenever I think of it.

September 22nd is the Autumnal Equinox: The day the Sun enters Libra and the beginning of Autumn. In the same way that the Solstice marks the days of longest and shortest “light,” the Equinoxes mark the day of equal light. Nox is the Roman goddess of night so equinox literally means “equal night.” The glyph for Libra represents the setting sun expressing the balance between night and day. According to tradition, the Sun is “exalted” in Aries while halfway through its circuit along the ecliptic, it is in “fall” in Libra, Aries’ opposite sign.

Read the rest of this entry »


Happy MayDay!

maypole_2003I was privileged to attend the Avery Coonley School for a number of years and one of our traditions was the May Pole dance. The fifth graders got to demonstrate the weaving of the maypole ribbons as part of the Spring Fair celebration in front of the reflecting pool. It was a fun, boisterous affair and the tipsy Maypole in the picture is exactly how I remember ours ending up.🙂

All things considered, I preferred the solemn Thanksgiving festival at the opposite end of the year, when we would march in procession through the auditorium (the archway in the pic) by class, with each class singing a different song or hymn, every student wearing matching brown cloaks and each carrying fruits or vegetables of some kind,  that would be added to a Cornucopia display on the stage, and given to the Salvation Army afterward. It was simple and very moving.

 

Click here for the official Avery Coonley School site

And here for the Avery Coonley Wikipedia Article


For you: The All-Purpose Holiday Card

For you: The All-Purpose Holiday Card

I received this picture years ago and have no idea where it is from any more. I tried finding it on Google but didn’t have any luck. If you know where it is from, let me know and I’ll give proper credit.

Anyway Happy Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc.


Thanksgiving and Turkey

Happy Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving as a tradition

Christianity.com says: the pilgrims never observed an annual Thanksgiving feast in autumn. In the year 1621, they did celebrate a feast near Plymouth, Massachusetts, following their first harvest. But this feast most people refer to as the first Thanksgiving was never repeated.

Thanksgiving Timeline from The Library of Congress

1621 – Pilgrims and Native Americans celebrated a harvest feast in Plymouth, Massachusetts.
• 1630 – Settlers observed the first Thanksgiving of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in New England on July 8, 1630.
• 1777 – George Washington and his army on the way to Valley Forge, stopped in blistering weather in open fields to observe the first Thanksgiving of the new United States of America.
• 1789 – President Washington declared November 26, 1789, as a national day of “thanksgiving and prayer.”
• 1800s – The annual presidential thanksgiving proclamations ceased for 45 years in the early 1800s.
• 1863 – President Abraham Lincoln resumed the tradition of Thanksgiving proclamations in 1863. Since this date, Thanksgiving has been observed annually in the United States.
• 1941 – President Roosevelt established the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day. Read the rest of this entry »


Gratitude and Rainbows

Mother nature commented on yesterday’s post in her own subtle way. I was driving the truck up to Shoreline today in a wipers-on-high downpour and Rob and Gracie, the dogs, were sleeping in the back seat. Suddenly the rain stopped, the sun came out and the most beautiful rainbow appeared. I can’t believe I left out that wonderful and inspiring manifestation of rain.