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1932 Map of the medicinal plants in the United States

credit: David Rumsey Map Collection

You know how I love infographics and this is just the best of everything, a map, plants and history all in one.

I found it on Slate, their text says:

The map, printed by the National Wholesale Druggists’ Association for use of pharmacists during a promotional campaign called Pharmacy Week, was intended to boost the image of the profession. At a time when companies were increasingly compounding new pharmaceuticals in labs, pharmacists wanted to emphasize their ability to understand and manipulate the familiar medicinal plants that yielded reliable “vegetable drugs.” “Intense scientific study, expert knowledge, extreme care and accuracy are applied by the pharmacist to medicinal plants and drugs,” the box of text in the map’s lower left-hand corner reads, “from the point of origin through the intricate chemical, botanical, and pharmaceutical processes employed in preparing medicine.” As historians Arthur Daemmrich and Mary Ellen Bowden write, the early 1930s were a turning point in the pharmaceutical industry.

In the previous decades, chemists working for large companies had begun to systematically invent new medicines for the first time, developing synthesized aspirin and vaccines for diseases like tetanus and diphtheria. The 1938 Food, Drug, & Cosmetic Act would bring a heightened level of federal regulation to the production of new medicines. And in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, researchers would go on to invent a flood of new antibiotics, psychotropics, antihistamines, and vaccines, increasingly relying on synthetic chemistry to do so. The pharmacist’s direct relationship to the preparation of medicine would diminish accordingly.

I am pretty sure that most people don’t realize that the change over to synthetic drugs was that recent.

That in your grandparents day the pharmacist actually mixed up a medication for them, they didn’t just transfer pills from a big bottle to a smaller bottle. Did you? 

Slate Article: History of medicinal plants: Map of the plants in the United States from 1932.

Medicinal Plant Map: David Rumsey Map Collection

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What It’s Like To Get A Mastectomy | Prevention

I saw this title in my newsfeed this morning and clicked on it with some trepidation but despite its lurid beginning it has some good information. I especially like how it contrasts the two women’s differences in pain perception, one woman describes not even taking any of the prescribed pain meds but just having a sensation of tightness post-mastectomy while another describes the pain as almost unbearable. I had the same experience as the first, aside from the horrid hangover from the anesthesia I had no pain at all and I wonder if the pain others speak of is sometimes from the placement of tissue expanders or implants under the muscle when they opt for reconstruction rather than from the mastectomy itself or if this is just an example of human variability. One of the women quoted also mentions the drains, (see second pic) those were the worst! Not actually having to deal with them but more like worrying about them every time I turned or moved for the ten days they were in place. Anyway, here’s Ann Marie’s article:

What It’s Like To Get A Mastectomy

After being diagnosed with breast cancer at age 40, Ann Marie Otis, now 44, had, as she says somewhat jarringly, her breasts “amputated.”It’s not a term most of us would choose to describe a double mastectomy, but she’s not wrong. After all, an amputation is the surgical removal of an extremity; a mastectomy is the surgical removal of a breast. Thinking of the two procedures as one in the same could drastically change our perception of breast cancer treatment. “A mastectomy is a big life change,” says Otis, who has documented much of her own healing—both physical and emotional—click to read more

Source: What It’s Like To Get A Mastectomy | Prevention

 


This Before and After Pic Is a Total Lie…For a Good Reason | Women’s Health

In one pic, she appears noticeably fitter than in the other, but the thing is…she shot the selfies 30 seconds apart. Jessica, who created the Insta account to chronicle her body transformation on Kayla Itsines’s Body Bikini Guide program, explains in the caption that poor posture is to blame for her “before” picture. In the “after,” she says she’s simply standing up straight, flexing slightly, and had adjusted her bikini bottoms.

Source: This Before and After Pic Is a Total Lie…For a Good Reason | Women’s Health

Yep, I look at Before and After pics too and this caught my eye because it is ultimately such a good reminder about posture and self-affirmation rather than some magical weight loss pill or exercise plan that will get you in shape for Summer. Something to think about 🙂


blogger perks

Isn’t it interesting that when you contract the word “perquisite” you drop the q and sub a k? The dictionary defines perk as a privilege or gain and we’ve gotten some cool perks over my years of blogging, a weekend at Crystal Mountain with Robbie was the most memorable.

flexbelt

But here is another, Flex Belt has offered me the opportunity to review their cool ab belt toning system. You know I love a gadget. It uses EMS, that is Electronic Muscle Stimulation with gel pads to give 150 muscle contractions in 30 minutes and best…  I get one for my very own!

In 6 weeks I’ll send them before and after pix. Yes, of course I’ll post them here.

I can’t wait ’til it gets here…

Click the link to check out their website: Flex Belt.

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Facebook posts their new policy on mastectomy photos

Facebook posts their new policy on mastectomy photos which states:

Does Facebook allow post-mastectomy photos?

Yes. We agree that undergoing a mastectomy is a life-changing experience and that sharing photos can help raise awareness about breast cancer and support the men and women facing a diagnosis, undergoing treatment, or living with the scars of cancer. The vast majority of these kinds of photos are compliant with our policies. They go on to explain why breastfeeding photos are removed from Facebook: However, photos with fully exposed breasts, particularly if they’re unaffected by surgery, do violate Facebook’s Terms. These policies are based on the same standards which apply to television and print media, and that govern sites with a significant number of young people. I don’t take credit here because I admit I really didn’t have any opinion on whether Facebook should or should not allow pictures like mine to be broadcast all over their site. I mean, it is their site and who are FB’s real customers? The advertisers, right? Do you think they want mastectomy photos gathering shares & likes? I don’t see why they would. What IS weird though is why FB, is so nervous about breasts. OK, it isn’t weird, they are just using the same criteria that all other US media use but what on earth is wrong with breastfeeding?  In my opinion, breastfeeding should be more visible,  I mean, it is normal, it’s natural! Wouldn’t we all be better, calmer and happier seeing more of that? I know I would. Well anyway, now that Facebook has clarified their policy, about half the sites that are reporting on it are using, yup… my photo. Here is a sample: inquisitr posts new facebook policy

Prophylactic Mastectomy: Angelina, Sharon and Me

Angelina Dunthor

Angelina as Lara Croft

I was engrossed in making a presentation on the Part of Fortune for class this morning and completely missed Angelina Jolie’s announcement that she had had a prophylactic mastectomy until it was brought to my attention by a friend who asked if she could use a quote from me in light of it!

Once I looked the article up, I was thrilled that she had gone ahead with the surgery since I had thought about it back when she’d lost her mother to Ovarian Cancer, a related cancer. What shocked me was reading so many negative comments from people who don’t understand the context of a decision like hers. Sharon Osbourne received the same negative feedback when she made the same decision last year and it just amazes me how cruel and shallow people can be. I guess they are just proof that some people never really make it out of middle-school.

Their situations point up some differences between 1993, when I had my surgery, and 2013. In 1993, the BRCA gene test was new and no one was quite sure what percentage of cases it would account for, so I didn’t even have the test. We mostly discussed family medical histories. I had a traditional mastectomy which removed all breast tissue, leaving large scars. Reconstruction at a later time was offered but I preferred to stick with external prostheses and to cover the scars with tattoos. Angelina chose a skin sparing, immediate reconstruction option which she says left her with only small scars. Her cancer risk is slightly higher than mine but I am sure her results are more aesthetic than mine were pre-ink. Sharon had implants removed and I don’t know if she’s replaced them or not.

I’ll discuss why prophylaxis IS a reasonable way of dealing with cancer in another post, K?

Here is a link to Jolie’s New York Times piece.

And a link to Sharon Osbourne.

Amoena makes external breast prostheses.


Fit competition

English: Frosted cupcakes from Mon Petit Cupca...

Just got a text about this…  “did you ever notice that if you mention to a co-worker that you are on a diet, only to have them pressure you to try the cupcakes in the staff lounge?”

I have noticed over the years that if you are ever going to try to get any competition going in an office or home, start an exercise competition. With exercise, people will strive to exercise more than each other. While if you start a diet competition, generally people will either “cheat together” or will try to knock each other off their diets, really! And if you didn’t think the mere mention that you were dieting meant you were starting a competition… WRONG! LOL

 

Is it human nature?

 

I think it is that exercise is a positive thing in that it is something that we can compete at by  DOING  more than someone else.

 

While dieting is a negative thing in that it implies that you compete by not doing something, like eating fewer cupcakes than someone else. “Eat Fewer” just doesn’t make sense to an action oriented person the way “walk 20 minutes” does.

 

Anyone can see that the way to win at this sort of game is to make the other co-worker eat more cupcakes! 🙂